Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

What Doctors Don't Tell You

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!
November 2019 (Vol. 4 Issue 9)

Talking works as well as drugs for major depression
About the author: 
Bryan Hubbard

Talking works as well as drugs for major depression image

People suffering from major depression fare just as well by talking about the problem as taking a powerful antidepressant.

After five years, people who used cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)—the 'talking therapy'—were coping as well as those who instead had opted to take antidepressants.

The drugs are certainly a cheaper option, at least initially. But when costs of changing medications, side effects or having a relapse are factored in, there's hardly any difference between the two, say researchers from the University of Michigan.

Looking at the outcomes of the two groups, the researchers say that people who had CBT saw their symptoms improve just as much as those taking antidepressants—and a survey discovered that most people with depression would prefer to be treated with CBT or some other non-drug approach.

The problem is that only a quarter of them ever have the chance. The costs of starting CBT are higher and there aren't enough therapists on the ground to treat people.

But if insurers could see that, in the long run, there wasn't much difference in costs and outcomes between the two approaches, perhaps more funding could be made available to the talking therapies, the researchers add.


References

(Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, 2019; doi: 10.7326/M18-1480)

You may also be interested in...

Support WDDTY

Help support us to hold the drugs companies, governments and the medical establishment accountable for what they do.

Advertisements

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions..

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

© 2010 - 2019 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved