Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

What Doctors Don't Tell You

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!
December 2018 (Vol. 3 Issue 10)

Women with strong social connections more likely to survive breast cancer
About the author: 
Bryan Hubbard

Women with strong social connections more likely to survive breast cancer image

Women are more likely to survive breast cancer if they have a strong social network of friends and family—but those who are more isolated are twice as likely to die from the disease.

Having a strong social network—and this can include having a partner and friends or an extended family, or being a member of some community group, or going to the local church—seems to have a protective effect, and reduces the risk of dying from the cancer. In fact, strong social ties lower the odds of dying from a range of chronic diseases.

Researchers from the Kaiser Permanente research centre in California discovered the protective powers of strong social networks when they profiled 9,267 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

During the follow-up, there were 1,448 recurrences of the cancer, and 1,521 women had died, although only 990 had died from the cancer. Recurrences and deaths were more common in women who lived on their own or had little or no social interaction outside the home: they were 1.43 times more likely to see the breast cancer recur, and were 1.64 times more likely to die from the cancer. They were also 1.69 times more likely to die from any disease.

Having a partner and strong community ties had more of a protective effect among white women, while having an extended family and friends was more important among non-white women.


References

(Source: Cancer, 2016; published online: 12 December, 2016: doi: 10.1002/cncr.30440)

You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions..

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

© 2010 - 2018 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved