Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

What Doctors Don't Tell You

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!
August 2018 (Vol. 3 Issue 6)

Dentists don`t need to drill and fill tooth decay, new research discovers
About the author: 

Dentists don`t need to drill and fill tooth decay, new research discovers image

Dentists have been too quick with the drill. Dental decay happens far more slowly than dentists have believed, new research has discovered, and there are several ways it can be reversed without using the drill and fill technique used by dentists for decades.

It can take up to eight years for decay to penetrate to the inner layer or dentine of the tooth, and that`s plenty of time to use other non-drill methods, such as fluoride varnish, better brushing technique and reducing sugar snacks between meals.

Researchers at the University of Sydney have discovered that tooth decay, or dental caries, can be stopped, reversed and prevented without using the traditional drill and fill method. Their discoveries, based on a seven-year research programme, herald a major shift in dental practice. It?s unnecessary even for patients ever to have a filling, the researchers say.

For a long time it was believed that tooth decay was a rapidly progressive phenomenon and the best way to manage it was to identify early decay and remove it immediately in order to prevent a tooth surface from breaking up into cavities, said lead researcher Prof Wendell Evans. After drilling, the cavity is then usually filled with amalgam.

But the process takes far longer than dentists believe, and isn?t even always progressive. If it does progress, it can take from four to eight years for the decay to start affecting the inner layer of the tooth.


References

(Source: University of Sydney, December 6, 2015)

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions..

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

© 2010 - 2018 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved