Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Fasting-and kinase inhibitors-are a one-two knockout punch against cancer
About the author: 

Chemotherapy can kill cancer and the patient, too-but there's a far less toxic approach that can be just as effective, researchers have announced this week

Chemotherapy can kill cancer and the patient, too-but there's a far less toxic approach that can be just as effective, researchers have announced this week. Fasting and using kinase inhibitors offer a new one-two knockout punch that kills the cancer cells by depriving them of the glucose they need for their rapid growth.

Kinase inhibitors are drugs that have been approved by America's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a cancer therapy-and it seems they are even more effective when the patient fasts, say researchers led by Valter Longo at the University of Southern California.

The new approach seems to be effective against breast, colorectal and lung cancers because it interferes with the 'Warburg effect', so named after the German physician who discovered that cancer cells need excessive amounts of glucose (sugar) from food in order to proliferate.

If cancer cells are deprived of glucose through fasting, they turn to an emergency back-up source, an enzyme called a kinase, to continue their growth. This is where the kinase inhibitors come in, as they block the kinase pathways that can feed the cancer cells.

Fasting makes the kinase inhibitors more effective, says Longo. "Patients would have to use them for less time to achieve the same results. We anticipate that fasting will also reduce the toxicity of kinase inhibitors as it reduces that of chemotherapy to normal cells", said Prof Longo.

His theories about fasting as a cancer therapy are being tested in several clinical trials in Europe.

(Source: Oncotarget, published online, March 30, 2015)


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved