Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Drug giants block research into cheaper remedies
About the author: 
WDDTY Team

Drug giants Novartis and Roche have been blocking research into a cheaper drug for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of blindness

Drug giants Novartis and Roche have been blocking research into a cheaper drug for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of blindness. The company refused to carry out trials on the two drugs, and independent research that found no difference between them was undermined.

The companies also used its "key opinion leaders" and charities they sponsor, including the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), to raise safety worries about the cheaper drug, an investigation by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has found.
The General Medical Council (GMC) has played its part and has refused to issue guidance on using the cheaper drug, so leaving doctors confused and worried that they may be open to legal claims if they used the alternative.

The controversy centres on two AMD drugs, Lucentis (ranibizumab) and Avastin (bevacizumab). Both are manufactured by Roche, although Novartis has marketing rights for Lucentis in Europe. The difference in cost is staggering; the UK's NHS spends lb244m a year on Lucentis, but using Avastin would save it lb102m a year.

Although Avastin was once the preferred drug for AMD, it was always prescribed 'off-label', which means it was used for a condition for which it had not been licensed to treat, a common practice in medicine. It is still regularly used in Europe and the US.

(Source: BMJ, 2015; 350: h1654)


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved