Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

News2012September › Heart patients must stop taking lethal NSAIDs immediately, urge researchers › September 2012

Heart patients must stop taking lethal NSAIDs immediately, urge researchers

Heart patients are often advised to take NSAID drugs to help ward off another attack...but the advice isn't just wrong, it can actually be lethal

Heart patients are often advised to take NSAID drugs to help ward off another attack...but the advice isn't just wrong, it can actually be lethal. Doctors are being urged to get all their heart patients off the drugs immediately.
Common painkillers in the NSAID (non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs) family - which include ibuprofen and naproxen, as well as prescription drugs such as Celebrex (celecoxib) - can cause a fatal heart attack even years after a person has had a first attack.
"It is important to get the message out to doctors taking care of patients with cardiovascular disease that NSAIDs are harmful," says researcher Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen from the Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte in Denmark.
She and her research team made the worrying discovery after they tracked the progress of 100,000 people aged 30 or older who had suffered a first heart attack between 1997 and 2009. Of these, 45 per cent were taken an NSAID, and the drug increased their risk of dying from any cause by 59 per cent in the first year, and by 63 per cent over the following five years. The risk of a second heart attack increased by 30 per cent in the first year, and this rose to 41 per cent over the next five years.
Normally, a heart attack patient's risk of a second attack falls within the first few years, until there is no extra risk after five years or so.
(Source: Circulation, published ahead of print, September 10, 2012; doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.112607).


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved