Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Parent of the Week: Father spends own money to prove suicide link to acne drug
About the author: 

Our Parent of the Week award goes to Liam Grant, who has spent lb340,000 of his own money on research that suggests the acne drug Roaccutane may be linked to depression and suicide

Our Parent of the Week award goes to Liam Grant, who has spent lb340,000 of his own money on research that suggests the acne drug Roaccutane may be linked to depression and suicide. Mr Grant's own son, also called Liam, committed suicide while he was taking the drug.

One of the studies, which was published by the American Academy of Psychiatry, scanned the brains of 15 Roaccutane patients and 15 others who were taking another acne drug. There were changes in the brains of the Roaccutane group that were associated with depression.

Roche, the drug's manufacturer, has already offered to pay Mr Grant all of his research costs together with a no-liability sum of lb800,000. Mr Grant has refused to settle and is instead pressing for a public hearing in court.
Despite the behind-the-scenes offer, Roche's public stance is to vigorously deny any link between Roaccutane and depression and suicide. The drug has been suspected of causing more than 100 suicides or attempted suicides over the years, and Roche has been forced by drug regulators to include a warning of possible suicidal tendencies in the drug information sheet.

Researchers at Bath University have also recently established a link to depression in a study involving mice. It's not known if similar behavioural patterns would be replicated in humans, the researchers conclude, but we think we know the answer Mr Grant might give.

(Source: The Guardian, 19 September 2006).

E-news broadcast 21 September 2006 No.294 [Subscribe]


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved