Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

ADHD: It could just be a breathing problem
About the author: 
WDDTY Team

If you know a child with learning difficulties or who's hyperactive, the chances are that he or she also suffers from breathing problems at night

If you know a child with learning difficulties or who's hyperactive, the chances are that he or she also suffers from breathing problems at night.

Breathing difficulties and snoring are now being seriously considered as a cause of ADHD behavioural patterns.
Unfortunately, most parents don't even realize their child has problems breathing properly at night - and even if they did, they wouldn't have thought it was anything to do with hyperactivity or learning problems.

But scientists have discovered that sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), as it's known, may be the unsuspected cause of ADHD-spectrum problems - or it may be misdiagnosed as ADHD.

Symptoms of ADHD tend to appear early on in a child's life, and the chances are that there is an associated breathing problem that goes with it.

Scientists have discovered that children whose breathing problems are tackled early also go on to enjoy greater academic success. In one study of 19 children aged between six and 16, those with breathing problems also had lower IQ levels than children who were able to breathe properly at night.

In another study, brain scans of children who had breathing problems revealed neural injury in the area associated with learning and memory.

Often, neither doctors nor parents realize that ADHD may be a wrong diagnosis, and that the underlying problem relates to breathing problems. Once these are treated and cleared, the supposed ADHD problems also go away.

Snoring is the most obvious sign of a breathing problem, and it affects around 1 in 5 children. However, this is for mild cases where the child snores around three times a week. Severe cases, where the child snores frequently every night, affects just 1 in 20.

Other signs might include laboured breathing, or snorting and gasping; others again may adopt unusual sleeping positions, or suffer from nightmares of drowning or choking.

If your child has SDB and ADHD, the choices offered by medicine are limited. At one extreme there's surgery to remove the tonsils and adenoids, but this often doesn't work on its own. Another option is 'continuous positive airway pressure therapy', which involves an electronic device that delivers constant air pressure via a nasal mask.

(Source: Journal of the American Medical Association, 2007; 297: 2681-2).

Click here to receive health news by email


Share this article:
del.icio.us | Digg it | ma.gnolia | Newsvine | Onlywire | reddit | Netscape | StumbleUpon

You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved