Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Websites against vaccination get the needle
About the author: 

New US research criticises websites opposing childhood vaccinations for appealing to parents' emotions when trying to convey their message, and including claims about vaccination that are not supported by studies from peer-reviewed medical journals

New US research criticises websites opposing childhood vaccinations for appealing to parents' emotions when trying to convey their message, and including claims about vaccination that are not supported by studies from peer-reviewed medical journals.


The investigators, from Northwestern University in Chicago, found that, of the 22 websites they evaluated, most claimed that vaccines weaken a child's immune system. In addition, 95 per cent voiced the opinion that vaccine side-effects are underreported, and 64 per cent offered information on how to legally avoid immunising a child, such as by seeking a philosophical exemption.


The study's conclusions are, at best, unhelpful and, at worst, hypocritical, given that the government's claims for the benefits of vaccination are themselves poorly supported by good science and that government-sponsored ads - often bleak black-and-white affairs trumpeting that 'children have died, childhood diseases haven't' - are usually powerful exercises in emotional blackmail.


The authors also criticise the fact that antivaccination websites use 'emotionally charged stories' from parents. They note, for instance, that 55 per cent of the websites included accounts from parents who suspected that their child was hurt or killed as a result of vaccination, and another 25 per cent contained photos of the injured children.


Nevertheless, antivaccine lobbyists counter, given medical science's seeming lack of interest in the safety of vaccines, it is only through such anecdotal evidence that parents can begin to build a picture of just how dangerous childhood vaccines can be.


Criticised, too, was the suggestion that vaccinations can spark a wide variety of illnesses, including allergies or asthma, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), autism and Crohn's disease.


The authors say these connections have yet to be scientifically proven. But, yet again, they fail to mention that no serious studies have ever been carried out to assess the possible adverse effects of childhood vaccination.


Initially worrying, the only solid conclusion to be drawn from this report is that it is the latest in the multipronged attack on those individuals who have the courage to criticise the blind faith that government bodies continue to put into vaccination (JAMA, 2002; 287: 3245-8).


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved