Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

News1999April › Laser surgery for angina can be fatal, say critics › April 1999

Laser surgery for angina can be fatal, say critics

Revolutionary laser surgery for treating angina is dangerous, and at least 5 per cent of patients die soon after the operation, a damning new study has found

Revolutionary laser surgery for treating angina is dangerous, and at least 5 per cent of patients die soon after the operation, a damning new study has found.

The technique, known as transmyocardial laser revascularisation (TMLR), significantly increases the risk of death and serious illness, and yet offers no benefit to patients over traditional drug therapy.

The study, carried out by an influential team of specialists based at Papworth Hospital in Cambridge and at other centres, could mean that TMLR disappears as an option in British hospitals.

The research involved 188 patients with refractory angina who were randomly assigned TMLR plus normal medication or medical management alone. Both groups had their exercise capacity regularly assessed with a treadmill.

While differences in exercise capacity were not significant between the two groups, 5 per cent of the TMLR group died soon after surgery and, after 12 months, just 89 per cent were still alive compared with 96 per cent of the medical management group.

An earlier study had found that the mortality rate of TMLR patients was 10 per cent, but the Cambridge researchers believe they produced better results only because they were monitoring patients with less serious conditions.

In an accompanying editorial, Rene Pretre from the University Hospital in Zurich says that laser therapy should be made available only at a handful of specialist centres (Lancet, 1999; 353: 519-24).


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved