Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Mammograms: needless exposure
About the author: 
WDDTY Team

American doctors who routinely give mammograms to women under 50 are needlessly exposing them to radiation and inaccurate diagnoses, charge two leading British cancer specialists

American doctors who routinely give mammograms to women under 50 are needlessly exposing them to radiation and inaccurate diagnoses, charge two leading British cancer specialists.

In a special feature in the British Medical Journal (4 December 1993), Ismail Jatoi and Michael Baum from London's Royal Marsden Hospital label doctors following the American Cancer Society's suggestions for mammogram screening of women under 50 "negligent" if they don't warn patients of the potential dangers.

In America, the ACS advocates that all women from the age of 40 be screened, whereas in Europe, screening is not recommended for women under 50.

"Advocating mammography for younger women without obtaining proper informed consent, including the potential for harm as well as for benefit, must be considered negligent," say Jatoi and Baum.

They argue that this approach is flawed because in many cases, earlier diagnosis doesn't improve prognosis; women must live with the knowledge that they have cancer for longer than necessary.

This type of aggressive screening also results in overdiagnosis detection and treatment of cancers which otherwise would have remained dormant, doing no harm.

There is also the problem of radiation exposure which itself can cause cancer and of turning up "false positives", in which women are wrongly told they have cancer.

Baum and Jatoi point out that both Europe and America came to their vastly different approaches after reviewing exactly the same data, which show no benefit from screening women earlier.

In their view, the Americans opted for earlier screening even though the literature doesn't support it because they tend to favour aggressive medical intervention and reject conclusions that don't fit in with what they perceive as an obvious benefit.


You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved