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Peripheral neuropathy

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One reader has suffered from this for years, and wondered if there were other options other than painkillers

One reader has suffered from this for years, and wondered if there were other options other than painkillers. Another reader also wanted to know the difference between diabetic and peripheral neuropathy. In the first place, says one reader, peripheral neuropathy (PN) can exist without any other disease, such as diabetes. Painkillers are certainly the last resort, but they may also be the only resort if the pain is especially bad. One thing to consider is the Bowen technique, which, according to one reader, has a good success rate with the problem. You could also try supplementing with omega 3 and 6, as these can help rebuild the neuronal sheath, and extra vitamin D can also help. One possible cause is a glutathione deficiency, so consider a liver cleanse, and try B complex with added B1 as this can help with all nerve complaints. From a naturopathic viewpoint, PN is often caused by a misalignment of the jaw, or temperomandibular joint to be more precise. You'll know it's out of line if you hear a clicking or crunching sound when you open and close your mouth. You should also check your teeth and gums for any abscess. A herbalist tells us that PN pain can be moderated by using St John's Wort or homoeopathic Hypericum. From an osteopath comes the suggestion that PN can be caused by the entrapment of a nerve. Pins and needles or numbness in the toes or fingers could be the clue here.


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