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Sea sickness

MagazineMay 2007 (Vol. 18 Issue 2)Sea sickness

A reader's husband is keen to take her on a cruise of Antarctica but she suffers badly from sea sickness

A reader's husband is keen to take her on a cruise of Antarctica but she suffers badly from sea sickness. Do readers know of any natural remedies that can help?

Several readers extol the virtues of ginger for treating seasickness. Suck on a ginger sweet, take a ginger supplement or chew some fresh or pickled ginger before and during your trip. You could also get hold of some dried ginger, mix it with some water and sip it throughout the journey.

Another idea is to try Sea-Bands, knitted, elasticated bands that you wear on your wrist. According to the manufacturer's website (www.sea-band.com), Sea-Bands have been "clinically tested against nausea and vomiting in travel, pregnancy, anaesthesia, chemotherapy and all conditions which induce nausea." They work by applying pressure on the Nei Kuan acupressure point on each wrist by means of a plastic stud. A number of readers swear by them. Says Anita, "I suffered from motion sickness all my life. I couldn't travel by road, air or sea...until I found Sea-Bands. Then I went on a wonderful cruise at the age of 70. I haven't stopped recommending them since."

Alternatively, you could turn to homeopathy. Malcom recommends the remedies Cocculus and Tabacum, while June suggests Nelson's Travella tablets. Travella contains a selection of homeopathic remedies - including Cocculus and Tabacum - specifically combined to bring relief for the symptoms of travel sickness. Take two tablets every hour for two hours before the journey, and two tablets hourly during the journey if necessary.

Other readers suggest ways of getting rid of seasickness for good. Sally says she managed to completely eliminate travel sickness from her life by using Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). Visit www.emofree.com for more information on this self-help method and to find a practitioner near you.

Dirk, however, says seasickness can often be alleviated through diet: "Sea sickness has been proven to be the result of too much histamine in the body. Therefore, when travelling, one needs to follow the same diet as for histamine intolerance. That means avoiding foods containing histamine, such as tomatoes, spinach, cheese, yoghurt, cream, smoked meat (including most processed meat), smoked fish, sauerkraut, soy sauce, miso, canned fish (and any fish not immediately deep-frozen after being caught), vinegar and any products containing vinegar. There are also a number of products that do not contain histamine, but liberate histamine in the body. These include nuts and seeds, alcohol, tropical fruits, strawberries, chocolate and any products containing glutamate. It would also be worth avoiding aspirin."

E-news broadcast 17 April 2007 No.351


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