Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Treatment notes no. 4586

About the author: 

A new, breakthrough study has discovered that doctors are human

A new, breakthrough study has discovered that doctors are human. As a result, they naturally view most of their patients as 'foolish, uncomprehending, hysterical or malingering'. This is certainly the case when the patient presents with a health problem that has a mysterious cause.

Unfortunately, the report continues, most illnesses have a mysterious cause, so it follows that most patients must be viewed by their doctor as perhaps foolish, uncomprehending, hysterical or malingering - or all of the above.

However, the doctor must overcome these natural, and human, feelings and should instead endeavour to communicate with the patient (even if he probably is hysterical or a malingerer).

Now, most patients can hold only seven thoughts in their head at one time, so we can safely add 'stupid' to that foregoing list. Professionals (i.e. non-patients) also use vague quantifiers such as 'rarely' and 'unlikely', which are instantly understood by a fellow professional. This confuses the patient, however, because he is also innumerate.

Worse, patients look for clear answers - for example, they like to label a disease and ask questions such as 'What's wrong with me, doctor?' - but yielding to that pressure is a trap that the professional must avoid at all costs.

Finally, don't use long words. When you have nothing to say to a patient who you doubt has anything wrong with him, use simple, monosyllabic terms - which, unfortunately, rules out such useful terms as 'moron' or, indeed, any of the foregoing terms that describe patients. However, words such as 'not' and 'ill' would work, as would 'don't' and 'know' (BMJ, 2003; 326: 595-7).


Don't forget t. l. cleave in the story of refined carbohydrates

An antioxidant double act

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved