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What causes diabetes?

About the author: 

Only around 10 per cent of type I diabetics have a family history of the disease

Only around 10 per cent of type I diabetics have a family history of the disease. The most believable theory is that most diabetes is linked to immune system function.

For example, 75 per cent of diabetics have antibodies to their own pancreatic cells, compared with 0.5-20 per cent of those without diabetes thus supporting the theory that it is an autoimmune disease (Murray M, Pizzorno J, Textbook of Natural Medicine, Seattle: John Bastyr College Publications, 1988).Several things can cause the immune system to go haywire. Infections such as pertussis, hepatitis and rubella, and with coxsackievirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and herpesvirus can initiate the autoimmune process. This link with viruses has led some observers to believe that the worldwide programme of early vaccinations may have a role to play in the development of diabetes.

There is also a theory that some of the drugs used during pregnancy and labour, like the synthetic hormones used to induce labour and pain relieving drugs such as the epidural (but not pethidine), may initiate the process of autoimmune destruction (Landymore Lim L, Poisonous Prescriptions, PODD, 1994).

IDDM has recently been linked to allergy to cow's milk, a link previously found only with NIDDM.

Many observers, including WDDTY panellist Leo Galland, believe that nitric oxide in the body is an important mediator in the development of type I diabetes. "Too little nitric oxide may contribute to high blood pressure, atherosclerosis and male sexual impotence," says Galland. "And although modest production of nitric oxide is important for normal cell function, high levels may be extremely toxic, killing the body's own cells and causing shock."

High levels of nitric oxide can kill or inhibit pancreatic beta cells. Recently, destruction of the pancreas by nitric oxide was shown to be an early event in the development of diabetes (Lancet, 1994; 343: 1199-206). Only around 10 per cent of type I diabetics have a family history of the disease. The most believable theory is that most diabetes is linked to immune system function.

For example, 75 per cent of diabetics have antibodies to their own pancreatic cells, compared with 0.5-20 per cent of those without diabetes thus supporting the theory that it is an autoimmune disease (Murray M, Pizzorno J, Textbook of Natural Medicine, Seattle: John Bastyr College Publications, 1988).

Several things can cause the immune system to go haywire. Infections such as pertussis, hepatitis and rubella, and with coxsackievirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and herpesvirus can initiate the autoimmune process. This link with viruses has led some observers to believe that the worldwide programme of early vaccinations may have a role to play in the development of diabetes.

There is also a theory that some of the drugs used during pregnancy and labour, like the synthetic hormones used to induce labour and pain relieving drugs such as the epidural (but not pethidine), may initiate the process of autoimmune destruction (Landymore Lim L, Poisonous Prescriptions, PODD, 1994).

IDDM has recently been linked to allergy to cow's milk, a link previously found only with NIDDM.

Many observers, including WDDTY panellist Leo Galland, believe that nitric oxide in the body is an important mediator in the development of type I diabetes. "Too little nitric oxide may contribute to high blood pressure, atherosclerosis and male sexual impotence," says Galland. "And although modest production of nitric oxide is important for normal cell function, high levels may be extremely toxic, killing the body's own cells and causing shock."

High levels of nitric oxide can kill or inhibit pancreatic beta cells. Recently, destruction of the pancreas by nitric oxide was shown to be an early event in the development of diabetes (Lancet, 1994; 343: 1199-206).


Hormones in herbs or drugs don't imitate mother nature

Zocor

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