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Case study: Risks of Primulot Depot and pimulot to pregnancy

MagazineMarch 1996 (Vol. 6 Issue 12)Case study: Risks of Primulot Depot and pimulot to pregnancy

The fourth time that I became pregnant in 1976, my gynecologist put me on a course of treatment of Primulot Depot 250 mgs, injected intramuscularly for about 12 weeks

I had three miscarriages. The fourth time that I became pregnant in 1976, my gynecologist put me on a course of treatment of Primulot Depot 250 mgs, injected intramuscularly for about 12 weeks.

In April 1977 I gave birth to a little girl. In 1979 I became pregnant again and returned to the same consultant for advice on how to maintain the pregnancy. He told me that the treatment that I'd received in 1976 had since been withdrawn from the market because of unwanted side effects, particularly in baby girls. He went on to prescribe a tablet called Pimolut 10 mg, to be taken daily from my seventh week of pregnancy until my 16th week. I gave birth to another baby girl in 1980.My concern now is whether these hormones may have been responsible for the health and hormonal imbalances in my daughters, both of whom have experienced extremely difficult problems, starting at age 15. Conventional medicine has been of little help in finding the reasons for their ill health and severe emotional problems. Eventually, a doctor at The Centre for the Study of Complimentary Medicine at Southampton confirmed that they have both had liver, kidney, circulatory and hormonal (progesterone) deficiencies. Up until recently he could not offer an explanation as to why both my daughters should be having all these problems. I mentioned in passing my treatment during my pregnancies, and it was his opinion that the chances seemed pretty high that this was the reason. E R, Havant, Hants.....

Primolut, which, incidentally, is still on the market for all sorts of menstrual disturbances, is made up of the progestogen norethisterone (norethidrone in the States). These days, it's not supposed to be taken during pregnancy, after it was found to cause severe disturbances in both mother and baby.

According to the Physicians Desk Reference, progestogens taken during pregnancy have been known to have adverse effects on liver function and cause circulatory problems (including stroke), hormone imbalances and breast cysts; WDDTY panellist Dr Ellen Grant has treated several similar cases, she says, of daughters exposed to progestogens in the womb. Nutritional medicine may help to minimize the damage. Alternative practitioners out there: any other suggestions?


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