Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!

Mesalazine

About the author: 

"To a colitic it's freedom," announces Smith Klein and French about Asacol, its answer to sulphasalazine, as the drug for colitis with fewer side effects

"To a colitic it's freedom," announces Smith Klein and French about Asacol, its answer to sulphasalazine, as the drug for colitis with fewer side effects. This anti-inflammatory, which goes by the generic name of mesalazine, is the latest offering f

Sulphasalazine, a salicylate chemically related to aspirin, has two components: mesalazine and sulphapyridine. As the latter is supposedly responsible for the majority of serious side effects associated with sulphasalazine acute intolerance syndrome, characterized by cramping, acute abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea, as well as lowered sperm count and function, S K & F have chemically split the drug and retained the supposedly safer half.

Nevertheless, mesalazine lists as potential side effects many of those of its parent drug, including headaches and, for a drug supposed to treat gastrointestinal problems, a surprising number of gut problems: nausea, abdominal pain and, yes, diarrhea. If it doesn't make you feel better, it may, incidentally, exacerbate colitis in patients who have had similar problems with sulphasalazine.

Reports have also come through of lowered blood cell count, pancreatitis, and hepatitis. The main worry, however, is potential kidney problems, such as interstitial nephritis (inflammation), nephrotic syndrome (low blood protein and fluid in the tissues) and even kidney failure with oral treatment, which is "usually reversible on withdrawal," says SK & F. This has particular relevance for patients on "maintenance" therapy with an open-ended prescription.

Mesalazine should be avoided by patients with a known sensitivity to salicylates or severe kidney impairment, children under two, nursing mothers and, unless essential, pregnant women.


Bone scans

Blinded by science

You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved