Close X
Get more out of WDDTY.com
by joining the site for free
Free 17-point plan to great health
Twice weekly e-news bulletins
Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
Sign up for free and claim your
17-point plan to great health
Free 17-point plan to great health

Twice weekly e-news bulletins

Access to our News, Forums and Blogs
OR

If you want to read our in-depth research articles or
have our amazing magazine delivered to your home
each month, then you have to pay.


Click here if you're interested
Helping you make better health choices

What Doctors Don't Tell You

In shops now or delivered to your home from only £3.50 an issue!

Subscribe!
February 2018 (Vol. 28 Issue 11)

Ace inhibitors:

About the author: 

Ace inhibitors: image

Before taking a powerful prescription drug, the doctor - and patient - should weigh up the risks and benefits

Before taking a powerful prescription drug, the doctor - and patient - should weigh up the risks and benefits. Of course the doctor rarely does any such thing, and prescribes the drug as a matter of course.
Unfortunately no drug comes without side effects - and the drugs industry would argue that if one did, it wouldn't have any beneficial effects either. Take, for instance, the ACE (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) inhibitors, designed to reduce the risk of heart attack. Common side effects include low blood pressure, diarrhoea, cough, nausea and fatigue. More serious reactions can include angiodema, where vascular tissues fill with fluids and which can require emergency intervention, heart attack, hepatitis, jaundice, mental confusion, acute kidney failure and impotence.
But, then, if the drug is saving lives the risk of these life-endangering side effects may just be worth it. But, then again, if the drug isn't delivering those benefits the patient is risking his life for nothing.
And that's exactly what researchers have discovered about the ACE inhibitors, which are dished out to almost every heart patient. But low-risk patients - with a stable heart problem and good left ventricular function - derive absolutely no benefit from the drug.
They tested the ACE inhibitor trandolapril against a placebo in a group of 8,290 heart patients, and found there was no difference in the health and longevity of the two groups. In other words the ACE inhibitor was no better than a sugar pill - except that those taking the drug also ran the risk of hepatitis, acute kidney failure and angiodema.


Breast screening: image

Breast screening:

The secret cause of illness image

The secret cause of illness

You may also be interested in...

Latest Tweet

About

Since 1989, WDDTY has provided thousands of resources on how to beat asthma, arthritis, depression and many other chronic conditions.

Start by looking in our fully searchable database, active and friendly community forums and the latest health news.

Positive SSL Wildcard

Facebook Twitter

Most Popular Health Website of the Year 2014

© 2010 - 2017 WDDTY Publishing Ltd.
All Rights Reserved