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What Doctors Don't Tell You

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September 2018 (Vol. 3 Issue 7)

Bryan Hubbard

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About

Bryan Hubbard is Publisher and co-editor of WDDTY. He is a former Financial Times journalist. He is a Philosophy graduate of London University. Bryan is also the author of several books, including The Untrue Story of You and Secrets of the Drugs Industry.

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The powerful healing properties of baking soda

September 4th 2018, 16:58
273 views      

Innovations are often described as being the best thing since sliced bread—but what was the best thing before sliced bread? My money is on an ingredient that helps make the bread in the first place: baking soda (or bicarbonate of soda). It's the rising agent for breads and cakes that also doubles as a potent drain declogger and an efficient scrub to clean the inside of your oven.

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Do fewer patients die when the surgeon is away or on strike?

July 31st 2018, 14:21
372 views      

I can imagine that the typical surgeon, when he was a young boy (or girl, of course), was the sort who would keep fiddling around with things until his exasperated mother exclaimed: "For goodness sake, Bernard (Bernadette), it'll never get better if you keep touching it."

This fiddling around doesn't do anyone any good, least of all the patient. This universal truth struck me recently when I was reading a study that discovered that heart attack patients are more likely to survive if the hospital's leading cardiologists are away at a conference. It's like the urban myth that when doctors go on strike, fewer people die.

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What big picture?

July 17th 2018, 15:57
245 views      

If you're a doctor—or, better yet, a researcher at a pharmaceutical company—you think you've got human biology nailed. After all, you must know how it all works so that you can develop new drugs and prescribe and treat patients.

And because you've got it all figured out, you can laugh at unscientific alternatives like acupuncture and dismiss them for the quackery they are. Right?

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A maverick's passing

April 23rd 2018, 15:30
459 views      

We need our nay-sayers if medicine is ever to improve

The death of a maverick is always worth a moment's reflection. They often put their own personal ambitions and career on the back burner as they strive for something that's more important, such as changing the system they're a part of.

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Calories aren't all created equal

March 27th 2018, 11:59
814 views      

You wouldn't ask your doctor about nutrition any more than you'd interrogate a nomadic tribesman of the Sahara about the intricacies of snow. The typical doctor's dietary knowledge is primitive, but then, he's only been taught about it in medical school for an average of 10 or so hours over his five years of training.

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Getting the vax facts wrong

February 28th 2018, 15:43
812 views      

The media is pulled by the forces of simplification and sensationalism, says American sociologist Robert McChesney. I'd add a third 'S' to the list: suppression. All three are amply exercised when it comes to reporting on vaccinations, a touchy subject that has had journalists tying themselves up in knots for decades.

Simplification and sensationalism were the hallmarks of the coverage of gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield and his discovery that the triple MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) vaccine was causing inflammation in the guts of a small group of children, and which, he postulated, could presage autism.

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Blame the Russians

January 25th 2018, 17:54
787 views      

The vaccine debate has taken a sinister turn. Any bad news you read about the MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) and flu vaccines on social media sites has been placed there by Russian cyber units, plotting to destabilize the West, according to a British tabloid newspaper.


First they orchestrated Brexit, then they helped get Trump into the White House, and now those Kremlin hackers are targeting vaccines. The Daily Mirror reports that "Russian cyber units are spreading false information about flu and measles jabs, experts claim."1

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It's all a Wonderland

December 21st 2017, 14:07
1,330 views      

Curiouser and curiouser, as Alice might have said if she'd seen some of the research papers that have been passing across the WDDTY desks in recent weeks. They're curious because they provide more evidence of the humbling fact that we have so much still to learn about how the body works and how (or why) disease develops.

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Fake real news

November 21st 2017, 11:13
1,230 views      

In more innocent times, there was news, pure and simple. We believed most of what we were told in newspapers and on TV. Now, in the Days of Trump, we also have fake news: blatant untruths like 'Hillary Clinton uses a body double' or 'Donald's tan is natural.'

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Chinese delivery

October 25th 2017, 15:32
983 views      

The Economist magazine has recently been voted the world's most trusted news source, but even such a highly rated title can get it badly wrong when it reports on alternative medicine. In an editorial, it has accused the Chinese government of state-sponsored 'quackery'—for supporting the country's own ancient healing system, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

It's quackery because it's unproven, the magazine thunders, and yet the Chinese government is set to promote the use of TCM remedies globally, while upping its investment in an already extensive domestic network of TCM clinics and hospitals.

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Quiet as mice

August 29th 2017, 19:13
858 views      

I'm not a mouse; nor, I suspect, are you (unless you're a highly intelligent one who reads our magazine when you're not eating cheese or whizzing around on one of those running wheels—fun, aren't they?)

If you don't have a very serious identity crisis, this is not earth-shattering news, although it could be if you're a drug company. Mice are usually on the front line when drug companies begin testing the safety and effectiveness of a new drug. If the mice give it the paw's up, the drug will be given to healthy young medical students who aren't anything like the frail and elderly people who'll actually be the targets of the drug.

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Thinking makes it so

June 26th 2017, 21:52
1,020 views      

Here's a very radical thought: suppose it's all placebo. Does the thought that a remedy will work actually make it work—whether you've been given a prescription drug, a placebo or dummy drug, or a homeopathic pill?

The idea that the mind can make us feel better when we're given any kind of pill isn't new to medicine. It's the basis of the double-blind placebo-controlled trial, where a group of participants is given either an active drug or a 'dummy' placebo drug, and no one—not even the researchers—knows which they've been given. The drug is deemed a success if its positive effects outperform those of the placebo, even if by just a few per cent.

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The spaces between facts

March 31st 2017, 12:25
1,494 views      

William Halsted is revered among surgeons. He died in 1922, and yet is still considered one of the most influential surgeons ever, with many of his innovations—such as the use of rubber gloves and a surgical procedure on the digestive tract—still in use in operating theatres today.

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Sugar and spite

February 23rd 2017, 18:12
1,809 views      

It's a belief that still underpins our most popular weight-loss programmes and, if truth be told, somewhere deep down you probably believe it too. It's this: the more you eat, the more weight you'll put on.

It seems logical enough, but it's not entirely true. The idea of the equality of calories was started by the sugar industry in the late 1950s, and has been endorsed and promoted by supposedly independent researchers and our health guardians ever since. The National Institutes of Health in the US states that obesity is the result of "an energy imbalance"—you're eating more than you're burning off—and the UK's National Health Service tells us that "obesity is generally caused by consuming more calories—particularly those in fatty and sugary foods—than you burn off through physical activity. The excess energy is stored by the body as fat".

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Post-truth medicine

January 24th 2017, 15:26
1,128 views      

Last year was the start of something big, and it even gave birth to a new word: post-truth. Critics argued that much of the Trump presidential campaign was hallmarked by post-truths—and preposterous post-truths at that, such as President Obama being the founder of ISIS and opposition candidate Hilary Clinton running a paedophile ring from a pizza parlour.

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Do nothing

November 30th 2016, 08:18
1,246 views      

It should be the golden rule of medicine (yet it’s never taught in medical school): first, do nothing. Instead, the fledgling medic is cast in the mould of the hero, ready and waiting to intervene at the drop of a blood-pressure reading.

To help him in his quest to restore health to all are the paraphernalia of the newest technologies, including computer-aided screening tests, scans and X-rays, and the latest breakthrough drugs.

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